The Braille Monitor                                                                                               March, 2002

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.Recipes

This month's recipes come from members of the NFB of Maryland. Throughout the affiliate food auctions are a popular fund-raiser. The following recipes were submitted by cooks whose products have a great reputation. They make every auction a huge success.

 
Amy Herstein
Amy Herstein

Coconut Custard Pie

by Amy Herstein

Amy is a freshman at Mount Hebron High School in Ellicott City, Maryland. She is an active member of both the Central Maryland and Greater Baltimore Chapters. She will be a future leader in the NFB of Maryland too. The following recipe produces a best-seller at our auctions:

Ingredients:

4 eggs

6 tablespoons margarine or butter

1/2 cup flour

2 cups milk

3/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup coconut

Method: Combine all ingredients in blender and blend for several seconds. Pour into a greased and floured 10-inch pie pan (you can also use two 8-inch pans). Bake in preheated 350-degree oven for fifty to sixty minutes. This pie forms its own crust.

Minari Mari (Rolled Ham)

by Amy Herstein

One of Amy's hobbies is cooking Korean food. Here is a Korean recipe.

Ingredients:

20 slices of Parma ham (may substitute thinly sliced honey-baked ham)

20 stalks Japanese parsley or green onions

20 pine nuts

Dipping Sauce Ingredients:

1 tablespoon vinegar

2 tablespoons soy sauce

Method: Thoroughly wash Japanese parsley and cut off the roots. Bring salted water to a boil. Add parsley, root ends first. Blanch quickly, drain off boiling water, immerse immediately in cold water and drain. Roll up each slice of ham jelly-roll fashion. Lay one stalk of Japanese parsley on the counter, and place one piece of rolled ham across it at the root end. Then roll the two together tightly so that the parsley forms a belt around the center of the ham roll. Arrange on plate, seam side down. Top each with a pine nut. Mix ingredients for dipping sauce. Yields four to six servings.

 
Ellen Ringlein
Ellen Ringlein

Lemon Poppy Seed Bread

by Ellen Ringlein

Ellen Ringlein is an instructor in the rehabilitation department of Blind Industries and Services of Maryland. She is an active member of the Greater Baltimore Chapter. Each year at Christmas time, chapter members celebrate the holiday by having a dinner called the Christmas Repast. Members make their favorite recipe to share with the group. There is a contest for the best entrée, best side dish, or best dessert. Ellen is a frequent winner of this contest. Ellen said, "A good friend shared this recipe with me thirteen years ago, and I've had success with it ever since. It's easy, and everyone loves it. I even won the Greater Baltimore Chapter dessert contest at the Christmas repast in 1993 with it."

Ingredients:

1 package lemon cake mix

4 eggs

1/2 cup vegetable oil

1 cup orange juice

2 tablespoons or more poppy seeds

Method: Combine all ingredients and beat with electric mixer until thoroughly blended. Pour into greased baking pan of appropriate size. Bake at 350 degrees for forty to fifty minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.

Cajun Skillet Beans

by Ellen Ringlein

Ellen said, "This colorful and flavorful recipe comes from one of my favorite vegetarian cookbooks, Moosewood Restaurant Cooks at Home, which is available in Braille. This dish is also a Greater Baltimore Chapter Christmas Repast winner, this time in the side-dish category. Everyone at the Fat Tuesday feasts at Blind Industries and Services of Maryland loves these beans, too."

Ingredients:

1 medium onion, chopped

3 garlic cloves, pressed

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

3 celery stalks (about 1 cup chopped)

2 bell peppers, 1 red and 1 green (about 1-1/2 cups chopped)

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon dried basil

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, or more to taste

Pinch of cayenne

Pinch of salt

1 14-1/2 ounce can diced tomatoes

1 tablespoon honey

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

2 16 ounce cans black-eyed peas, drained

Optional: chopped scallions and/or grated cheddar cheese

Method: In a heavy saucepan or skillet, sauté the onions and garlic in the oil over medium heat. Add the chopped celery and peppers to the pan and continue to sauté for five minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the thyme, basil, oregano, black pepper, cayenne, and salt. Cover and cook for 5 minutes or until the onions are golden, stirring once or twice. Add the tomatoes, honey, and mustard, and simmer for 5 more minutes. Add the beans, cover, stir occasionally until thoroughly heated. Serve topped with chopped scallions and/or grated cheddar cheese.

Apple Dapple Cake

by Phyllis Jean Freeman

Phyllis is an active member of the Greater Baltimore Chapter who also finds time to do volunteer work at the National Center once a week. She is also a senior citizen who demonstrates that life goes on after blindness. The following recipe yields another bestseller at our auctions.

Ingredients:

3 eggs

1 1/2 cups oil (Crisco)

2 cups sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla

3 cups flour

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup chopped walnuts

3 cups chopped apples

Method: Mix all ingredients together, pour into greased floured tube pan. Bake 1 hour at 350 degrees. The following sauce should be poured over the cake after it comes out of the oven, while it is still warm. You can prepare the sauce while the cake is baking.

Sauce Ingredients:

1 stick butter

1/4 cup milk

1 cup brown sugar firmly packed

Method: Place ingredients in sauce pan. Cook for about 20 minutes or until the sauce is bubbling. Pour sauce over cake.

 

Tom Bickford
Tom Bickford

Overnight Buttermilk Biscuits

by Tom Bickford

Tom Bickford is a long-time leader in the NFB of Maryland. Monitor readers know him through his excellent articles. Here is one of his family's favorite recipes. It makes about three and a half dozen biscuits when he uses muffin pans. Cut the quantities in half if you have a smaller group to feed.

Ingredients:

1/4 cup sugar

8 tablespoons margarine (1 stick)

4 cups buttermilk

8-10 cups flour

2 5/8-ounce packages dry yeast

2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

2 teaspoons baking soda

Method: Cream together the sugar and margarine. (I use a fork.) Sift the remaining dry ingredients with the first two cups of flour just to get them all in and well mixed. Alternately combine some flour and buttermilk to the sugar/margarine mix. Use all the buttermilk and enough flour to form a soft and slightly moist dough. Place dough in a covered, not sealed, container in refrigerator for anywhere from four hours to two weeks. The dough will rise while it is cold. Use some or all of the dough any time after that. After the dough is removed from the refrigerator, it takes about an hour to rise in a warm place. I have used a baking sheet for drop biscuits or muffin pans. Lightly grease the pan. Dough will double in about an hour. Bake at 400 degrees for ten minutes. After baking, extra biscuits may be stored frozen and reheated.

 

The porthole portrait of George Washington by Rembrandt Peale.  From Gustavus A. Eisen Portraits of Washington, vol. ll (New York:Robert Hamilton & Associates, 1932. 416
The Porthole Portrait of George Washington by Rembrandt Peale][From Gustavus A. Eisen, Portraits of Washington, vol. II (New York: Robert Hamilton & Associates, 1932), 416.

George Washington's Eggnog

contributed by Don Morris

Don Morris is a long-time leader of the NFB of Maryland and one of the most active purchasers of baked goods in NFB of Maryland auctions. He found this recipe recently, supposedly written in George Washington's own words, and offered it to Monitor readers:

Ingredients:

1 quart cream

1 quart milk

1 dozen eggs

1 tablespoon sugar

1 pint brandy

1/2 pint rye whisky

1/2 pint Jamaican rum

1 quarter pint sherry

Method: Mix liquors together first. Separate yolks and whites of eggs. Add sugar to beaten yolks, mix well. Add liquor to beaten yolks, drop by drop first, slowly beat. Add cream and milk, slowly beating. Beat whites of eggs until stiff and fold slowly into mixture. Let set in a cool place for several days; taste frequently.

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