Braille Monitor                                                                                                           November 2004

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Steven Max Faults digs for fossils at the Maryland Science Center.   In the background is Bryce Gitzen
Steven Max Faults digs for fossils at the Maryland Science Center. In the background is Bryce Gitzen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circle of Life campers tour Goddard Space Flight Center. Left to right: Bryce Gitzen (back), Andrew Wai, and Paul Howard.
Circle of Life campers tour Goddard Space Flight Center.   Left to right: Bryce Gitzen (back), Andrew Wai, and Paul Howard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Rocket On! science campers actually launched a rocket with the guidance of NASA volunteers.  Here the NFB/NASA rocket sits waiting to be transported to the launch pad.  The rocket was about ten -and-a-half feet tall and weighed about seventy-five pounds.
The Rocket On! science campers actually launched a rocket with the guidance of NASA volunteers. Here the NFB/NASA rocket sits waiting to be transported to the launch pad. The rocket was about ten-and-a-half feet tall and weighed about seventy-five pounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During two weeks last summer, one in July and one in August, the National Federation of the Blind Science Academy conducted science camps for a total of twenty-four middle and high school students. From all indications they were life-changing events for the students. Read the first two articles in this issue for a full report.

The NFB/NASA rocket lifted off at 8:33 a.m. on August 19, 2004, with a full-color Whozit decal affixed to its outer skin.  Whozit soared to a height of 4,902 feet, and all the experiments worked flawlessly.   Unfortunately one of the rocket's parachutes did not open as planned, so the rocket broke apart when it hit the water.   Everything was recovered except the payload section of the rocket. The recovered sections will be put on display at the NFB Jernigan Institute along with a model of the original rocket.

The NFB/NASA rocket lifted off at 8:33 a.m. on August 19, 2004, with a full-color Whozit decal affixed to its outer skin. Whozit soared to a height of 4,902 feet, and all the experiments worked flawlessly. Unfortunately one of the rocket's parachutes did not open as planned, so the rocket broke apart when it hit the water. Everything was recovered except the payload section of the rocket. The recovered sections will be put on display at the NFB Jernigan Institute along with a model of the original rocket

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