Future Reflections Spring/Summer 1994, Vol. 13 No. 2

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HEAR YE! HEAR YE!

French Braille Club Seeks Pen-Pals
A few issues ago, we had an article about a Braille teacher who started a Braille club for sighted elementary students (How to Make a Braille Wave, Fall, 1992). Such clubs are rare, so you can imagine my surprise, and delight, when I received a letter from the founder of a similar Braille club in France. The members of this club, according to Mrs. Monique Bretelle, the founder and director of the club, are twenty-five sighted students (boys and girls) between the ages of 13 and 15. These club members want to correspond with blind Braille students in the U.S.A. They would write (using Braille, of course) in English, or French, or both; whichever their pen-pal preferred. The students want to exchange ideas and share information about themselves and their culture. They also hope to improve their English skills. Any blind student who is interested in corresponding with a member of this French Braille Club should write, in print or Braille, to Mrs. Bretelle, CollŠge Les MoliŠres, Club Braille, 78690 Les Essarts Le Roi, France. It would be helpful to include some information about yourself (age, interests, etc.) so a proper pen-pal match can be made.

Print-Braille Children's Book is Available
Naomi Knows It's Springtime, a children's book with a blind character, was reviewed in the Spring/Summer, 1993, issue of Future Reflections. We were advised after publication of the review that the book is available in print-Braille format from the National Braille Press (NBP). It was one of NBP's April, 1993, Book of the Month Club selections. It is $14.95 (same price as the print book). For information about purchasing the book contact National Braille Press, 88 St. Stephen Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, (617) 266-6160.

Braille Atlases & Dictionaries Available 
We have been asked to publish the following information:
The American Printing House for the Blind has two Braille atlases for sale, the Braille World Atlas and the Braille United States Atlas, and two dictionaries for children, American Heritage First Dictionary and American Heritage Children's Dictionary. Each can be purchased for under $20. For information about how to order these books contact American Printing House for the Blind, P.O. Box 6085, Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085, (502) 895-2405.

Cocaine and Vision
 The following item is reprinted from the July/August, 1992, issue of Pediatrics For Parents. The information originally appeared in the March, 1992, Ophthalmology Journal. The detrimental effects of cocaine use during pregnancy seem endless. Infants born to cocaine using women have an increased risk of visual problems. A recent report describes 13 infants exposed to cocaine in utero with optic nerve abnormalities, delayed visual development, and prolonged edema of the eyelids. At age two months these babies displayed a lack of visual responsiveness to their surroundings. The prolonged eyelid swelling is potentially vision-threatening and is, according to these doctors, a new clinical entity.

International Computer Camp 1994
Although children from the United States of America are not eligible for the following camp, I thought our readers might find the information interesting. Although we have made no effort to solicit readers from other countries, word about Future Reflections does get around. This announcement came from Sabine Koch, Librarian, University of Karlsruhe, Study Center for Visually Impaired Persons, Germany:

The Study Centre for Visually Impaired of the University of Karlsruhe (Germany), the Pilot Project Computer Science for the Blind of the University of Linz (Austria), the Training Centre for Electronic Data Processing of the Vocational Support Institue in Graz (Austria), and the Institute for Hearing and Visually Impaired in Linz (Austria) will hold the First International Computer Camp for blind and partially sighted children and teenagers. Children from the following countries are invited to participate: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Slovac Republic, and Spain. The number of participants from each country should be five visually impaired and two sighted persons. Each person shall be able to use their national language because the persons in charge will come from each country represented. However, knowledge of English for the joint activities is desirable. Participants 16 to 18 years of age will attend the camp in Linz, Austria, from July 30 to August 8, 1994. Participants ages 10 to 15 will stay in Graz, Austria, from August 29 to September 4, 1994. For further information contact: University Karlsruhe, Studienzerntrum Fr Sehgesch„digte, Engesserstr. 4, D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany. Telephone ++49-721/608-27 60; or contact University Linz, Institut fr Informatik, Modellverusch -Informatik Fr Blinde,- Altyenbergstr.69, A-4040 Linc, Austria. Telephone ++43-732/24 68-92 32.

Who Goes to College?
The following information is taken from the article, More College Freshmen Report Disabilities, which was published in the Winter, 1992, issue of Counterpoint, a publication of the National Association of State Directors of Special Education.

According to a 1991 survey of 140,000 freshman college students with disabilities, about 25 percent of them claimed to be visually impaired. This group had a higher percentage and larger  number of persons attending college than any other disability represented in the survey. More statistical information about college students with disabilities is provided in College Freshmen with Disabilities: A Statistical Profile, by Cathy Henderson. This book is available for $10 per copy, prepaid, from the American Council of Education, Department FD, One Dupont Circle, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20036; (202) 939-9320 or (800) 544-3284 (voice and TDD).

Leaps & Bounds
Doris Willoughby, who recently moved to Arvada, Colorado, sent us information about a new commercial indoor playground-Leaps & Bounds-which has just opened a facility in Arvada. Mrs. Willoughby noted only one problem when she visited the place:  a public address system that is a little too loud. The following information comes from the Leaps & Bounds brochure and a local newspaper article: 

Leaps & Bounds is a wholly-owned subsidiary of McDonald's USA. The company expects to have 91 outlets open around the country by the end of 1994. For an entrance fee, parents and children from ages one through twelve can leap, slide, crawl, climb, and play as hard as they like, on equipment that's designed with safety in mind. Kids can explore Leaps & Bounds' maze of brightly-colored tunnels, slides, bridges, ball pools, and more. There is a play area just for infants and toddlers and there are special rooms to accommodate children's parties. For extra security, a special parent-child identification system makes sure that adults and children who arrive together leave together. Food is served at a concession stand, and staff play with the children as well as serve food and otherwise supervise a safe play environment.

ROP Babies
We have been asked to publish the following information:
In 1989 our daughter Katie was born three months premature, weighing just 2 pounds 3 ounces. After nearly three months in the intensive care nursery, we were ecstatic when her doctor told us that Katie could come home in a week. Two days later we learned that Katie was blind because of retinopathy of prematurity. Retinopathy of prematurity, or ROP (formerly called retrolental fibroplasia or RLF), is a disease of the retina that prevents the eye from developing properly and can lead to permanent damage and blindness even later in life. ROP is responsible for more blindness among children in this country than all other causes combined.

In the past few years I have conducted an exhaustive search for information about ROP. In talking with adult friends who have ROP and with parents of children with ROP, the overwhelming need for information became obvious. I started the volunteer group

Prevent Blindness in Premature Babies to provide support and information to individuals and to parents of children who have ROP. Through our newsletter we can share what we've learned and ask for information from each other. Prevent Blindness in Premature Babies is also compiling a national registry of individuals with ROP to determine how often ROP occurs and the effects of ROP in later life. If you or your child was born prematurely and has any degree of vision problem, please write and request a copy of our newsletter and survey.

Today, at five years old, Katie is a happy, healthy, loving, and lovable handful. I look forward to hearing from you and to making our group a success. Margie Watson, founder. Write to Prevent Blindness in Premature Babies, P.O. Box 44792, Madison, Wisconsin 53744-4792.

Braille Music Piano Course
We have been asked to print the following information:
It has been found that print music, composed for the sighted and transcribed into Braille, is impractical for beginning blind students because the learning approach is quite different. The two-volume Braille Music Piano Course Book I was designed to teach Braille music symbols (which are a different code than literary Braille) in a progressive pattern with direct application to piano performance; that is, in the same manner that sighted students learn to read print music as they learn to play. The print music which is printed opposite each Braille page makes the material easier for the sighted teacher or parent to use with the blind student. It is hoped that this book will provide a useful and helpful start in the enjoyment of music for the Braille-reading younger child or adult who has had no musical background. For more information about the Braille Music Piano Course book and how to order it, write to CaraLynn Pender, HCR 4 Box 2746, Lewiston, Michigan 49756.

Adjustable Braille Stand
We have been asked to publish the following announcement:
This adjustable table-top BRAILLER STAND is made of solid oak and oak plywood, with a polyurethane finish. It measures 10 inches deep by 15 inches wide by 3 and 5/8 inches high at the back. The incline adjusts to six different positions ranging from 8 degrees to 18 degrees to provide maximum individual comfort when transcribing and/or proofreading Braille with the Perkins Braille Writer. The BRAILLER STAND may be purchased by sending $19.95 (California residents add $1.55 sales tax) to Michael Emerson, 17209 Santa Barbara Street, Fountain Valley, California 92708. For more information call (714) 841-3887.

 

French Braille Club Seeks Pen-Pals
A few issues ago, we had an article about a Braille teacher who started a Braille club for sighted elementary students (How to Make a Braille Wave, Fall, 1992). Such clubs are rare, so you can imagine my surprise, and delight, when I received a letter from the founder of a similar Braille club in France. The members of this club, according to Mrs. Monique Bretelle, the founder and director of the club, are twenty-five sighted students (boys and girls) between the ages of 13 and 15. These club members want to correspond with blind Braille students in the U.S.A. They would write (using Braille, of course) in English, or French, or both; whichever their pen-pal preferred. The students want to exchange ideas and share information about themselves and their culture. They also hope to improve their English skills. Any blind student who is interested in corresponding with a member of this French Braille Club should write, in print or Braille, to Mrs. Bretelle, CollŠge Les MoliŠres, Club Braille, 78690 Les Essarts Le Roi, France. It would be helpful to include some information about yourself (age, interests, etc.) so a proper pen-pal match can be made.

Print-Braille Children's Book is Available
Naomi Knows It's Springtime, a children's book with a blind character, was reviewed in the Spring/Summer, 1993, issue of Future Reflections. We were advised after publication of the review that the book is available in print-Braille format from the National Braille Press (NBP). It was one of NBP's April, 1993, Book of the Month Club selections. It is $14.95 (same price as the print book). For information about purchasing the book contact National Braille Press, 88 St. Stephen Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, (617) 266-6160.

Braille Atlases & Dictionaries Available 
We have been asked to publish the following information:
The American Printing House for the Blind has two Braille atlases for sale, the Braille World Atlas and the Braille United States Atlas, and two dictionaries for children, American Heritage First Dictionary and American Heritage Children's Dictionary. Each can be purchased for under $20. For information about how to order these books contact American Printing House for the Blind, P.O. Box 6085, Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085, (502) 895-2405.

Cocaine and Vision
 The following item is reprinted from the July/August, 1992, issue of Pediatrics For Parents. The information originally appeared in the March, 1992, Ophthalmology Journal. The detrimental effects of cocaine use during pregnancy seem endless. Infants born to cocaine using women have an increased risk of visual problems. A recent report describes 13 infants exposed to cocaine in utero with optic nerve abnormalities, delayed visual development, and prolonged edema of the eyelids. At age two months these babies displayed a lack of visual responsiveness to their surroundings. The prolonged eyelid swelling is potentially vision-threatening and is, according to these doctors, a new clinical entity.

International Computer Camp 1994
Although children from the United States of America are not eligible for the following camp, I thought our readers might find the information interesting. Although we have made no effort to solicit readers from other countries, word about Future Reflections does get around. This announcement came from Sabine Koch, Librarian, University of Karlsruhe, Study Center for Visually Impaired Persons, Germany:

The Study Centre for Visually Impaired of the University of Karlsruhe (Germany), the Pilot Project Computer Science for the Blind of the University of Linz (Austria), the Training Centre for Electronic Data Processing of the Vocational Support Institue in Graz (Austria), and the Institute for Hearing and Visually Impaired in Linz (Austria) will hold the First International Computer Camp for blind and partially sighted children and teenagers. Children from the following countries are invited to participate: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Slovac Republic, and Spain. The number of participants from each country should be five visually impaired and two sighted persons. Each person shall be able to use their national language because the persons in charge will come from each country represented. However, knowledge of English for the joint activities is desirable. Participants 16 to 18 years of age will attend the camp in Linz, Austria, from July 30 to August 8, 1994. Participants ages 10 to 15 will stay in Graz, Austria, from August 29 to September 4, 1994. For further information contact: University Karlsruhe, Studienzerntrum Fr Sehgesch„digte, Engesserstr. 4, D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany. Telephone ++49-721/608-27 60; or contact University Linz, Institut fr Informatik, Modellverusch -Informatik Fr Blinde,- Altyenbergstr.69, A-4040 Linc, Austria. Telephone ++43-732/24 68-92 32.

Who Goes to College?
The following information is taken from the article, More College Freshmen Report Disabilities, which was published in the Winter, 1992, issue of Counterpoint, a publication of the National Association of State Directors of Special Education.

According to a 1991 survey of 140,000 freshman college students with disabilities, about 25 percent of them claimed to be visually impaired. This group had a higher percentage and larger  number of persons attending college than any other disability represented in the survey. More statistical information about college students with disabilities is provided in College Freshmen with Disabilities: A Statistical Profile, by Cathy Henderson. This book is available for $10 per copy, prepaid, from the American Council of Education, Department FD, One Dupont Circle, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20036; (202) 939-9320 or (800) 544-3284 (voice and TDD).

Leaps & Bounds
Doris Willoughby, who recently moved to Arvada, Colorado, sent us information about a new commercial indoor playground-Leaps & Bounds-which has just opened a facility in Arvada. Mrs. Willoughby noted only one problem when she visited the place:  a public address system that is a little too loud. The following information comes from the Leaps & Bounds brochure and a local newspaper article: 

Leaps & Bounds is a wholly-owned subsidiary of McDonald's USA. The company expects to have 91 outlets open around the country by the end of 1994. For an entrance fee, parents and children from ages one through twelve can leap, slide, crawl, climb, and play as hard as they like, on equipment that's designed with safety in mind. Kids can explore Leaps & Bounds' maze of brightly-colored tunnels, slides, bridges, ball pools, and more. There is a play area just for infants and toddlers and there are special rooms to accommodate children's parties. For extra security, a special parent-child identification system makes sure that adults and children who arrive together leave together. Food is served at a concession stand, and staff play with the children as well as serve food and otherwise supervise a safe play environment.

ROP Babies
We have been asked to publish the following information:
In 1989 our daughter Katie was born three months premature, weighing just 2 pounds 3 ounces. After nearly three months in the intensive care nursery, we were ecstatic when her doctor told us that Katie could come home in a week. Two days later we learned that Katie was blind because of retinopathy of prematurity. Retinopathy of prematurity, or ROP (formerly called retrolental fibroplasia or RLF), is a disease of the retina that prevents the eye from developing properly and can lead to permanent damage and blindness even later in life. ROP is responsible for more blindness among children in this country than all other causes combined.

In the past few years I have conducted an exhaustive search for information about ROP. In talking with adult friends who have ROP and with parents of children with ROP, the overwhelming need for information became obvious. I started the volunteer group

Prevent Blindness in Premature Babies to provide support and information to individuals and to parents of children who have ROP. Through our newsletter we can share what we've learned and ask for information from each other. Prevent Blindness in Premature Babies is also compiling a national registry of individuals with ROP to determine how often ROP occurs and the effects of ROP in later life. If you or your child was born prematurely and has any degree of vision problem, please write and request a copy of our newsletter and survey.

Today, at five years old, Katie is a happy, healthy, loving, and lovable handful. I look forward to hearing from you and to making our group a success. Margie Watson, founder. Write to Prevent Blindness in Premature Babies, P.O. Box 44792, Madison, Wisconsin 53744-4792.

Braille Music Piano Course
We have been asked to print the following information:
It has been found that print music, composed for the sighted and transcribed into Braille, is impractical for beginning blind students because the learning approach is quite different. The two-volume Braille Music Piano Course Book I was designed to teach Braille music symbols (which are a different code than literary Braille) in a progressive pattern with direct application to piano performance; that is, in the same manner that sighted students learn to read print music as they learn to play. The print music which is printed opposite each Braille page makes the material easier for the sighted teacher or parent to use with the blind student. It is hoped that this book will provide a useful and helpful start in the enjoyment of music for the Braille-reading younger child or adult who has had no musical background. For more information about the Braille Music Piano Course book and how to order it, write to CaraLynn Pender, HCR 4 Box 2746, Lewiston, Michigan 49756.

Adjustable Braille Stand
We have been asked to publish the following announcement:
This adjustable table-top BRAILLER STAND is made of solid oak and oak plywood, with a polyurethane finish. It measures 10 inches deep by 15 inches wide by 3 and 5/8 inches high at the back. The incline adjusts to six different positions ranging from 8 degrees to 18 degrees to provide maximum individual comfort when transcribing and/or proofreading Braille with the Perkins Braille Writer. The BRAILLER STAND may be purchased by sending $19.95 (California residents add $1.55 sales tax) to Michael Emerson, 17209 Santa Barbara Street, Fountain Valley, California 92708. For more information call (714) 841-3887.

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