Posted by Carlton Walker | 10/12/2016 | Education, Parenting
In preparing for meetings of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) team, both parents and educators spend a great deal of time focused upon goals. Understanding the purpose and basis of goals can help all involved achieve this objective. Read more The Goal of Goals in IEPs...
Posted by Melissa Riccobono | 10/04/2016 | Education, Parenting
What is the purpose of your upcoming meeting? What has been going well? What needs to change? These are three questions you should ask yourself before each IEP meeting for your child. It is essential to know what things you want to accomplish and to be able to steer the meeting in the direction you need it to go and avoid being sidetracked by other topics or concerns. I have found the best way to accomplish this is to write things down ahead of time, make sure my points are as clear as possible, and to share my writing with the IEP team. Writing things down helps in the following ways. Read more The Importance of Keeping Written Records for IEP Meetings...
Posted by Melissa Riccobono | 09/20/2016 | Education, Parenting
Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings can feel overwhelming. Seated around the table are members of the team—a teacher of blind students, the classroom teacher, and the IEP team chair person. There may be an orientation and mobility specialist, speech pathologist, school psychologist, school administrator, special education director, physical therapist, and occupational therapist as well. Then, of course, there is you—the parent. Surrounded by all of these “experts” it can be easy to feel intimidated, especially if you are new to the IEP process. Read more A Member of the Team: Playing an Active Role on Your Blind Child’s IEP Team...
Posted by Melissa Riccobono | 09/14/2016 | Education, Parenting
In order to craft appropriate goals for an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), the team needs recent, high quality data. This data needs to cover the child’s current skills, strengths, and FACTOR IN future success. Here are some things to keep in mind when assessments are administered to, and interpreted for, children who are blind or low vision.   Read more An Overview of IEP Assessments...

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