Client-Centered Therapy versus Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy: Applications in Adjustment-to-Blindness Training Abstract

By Justin M. H. Salisbury, MA, NOMC, NCRTB, NCUEB

Preferred Citation

Salisbury, J. M. H. (2021). Client-Centered Therapy versus Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy: Applications in Adjustment-to-Blindness Training. Journal of Blindness Innovation & Research, 11(1). Retrieved from https://nfb.org/images/nfb/publications/jbir/jbir21/jbir110108.html. http://dx.doi/10.5241/11-196

Abstract

This article compares and contrasts person-centered therapy, also known as client-centered therapy, with rational emotive behavior therapy. This juxtaposition is used to highlight different parts of each model, which can be used effectively in the provision of adjustment-to-blindness training. Best practices for adjustment-to-blindness training are discussed and the counseling theories are applied to these training practices. Though adjustment-to-blindness training is not a mental health intervention, components of both counseling theories are useful in adjustment-to-blindness training. Since each instructional relationship between teacher and student is unique, each individualized style of instruction invokes its own combination of the two counseling theories.

Keywords

adjustment-to-blindness training, Structured Discovery, rational emotive behavior therapy, person-centered therapy, client-centered therapy

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DOI: http://dx.doi/10.5241/11-196

The Journal of Blindness Innovation and Research is copyright (c) 2021 to the National Federation of the Blind.